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St. John’s Vet Centre Wins National Award

St. John’s Vet Centre Wins National Award

News Release | July 16, 2019

[News Release July 16, 2019]

The Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland and Labrador (VSCNL) is the 2019 recipient of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) Practice of the Year Award. This prestigious award is given annually to a Canadian veterinary practice for outstanding achievement within their local community. The award was presented on July 16 during the CVMA Annual General Meeting and Awards Ceremony held during the CVMA’s annual convention. This year’s convention held in Toronto, Ontario, was executed as a joint congress in partnership with the World Small Animal Veterinary Association.

“It’s a great honour to be recognized by the CVMA,” said Dr. Trina Bailey, co-owner of VSCNL. “Our vision was to create a centre of excellence to provide specialty and emergency care allowing pets and pet owners to remain in the province. It was also incredibly important for us to build a team who was committed to the community in which we live and work. It’s a wonderful feeling to see this dream in action.”

The Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland and Labrador is the only referral hospital and 24/7 emergency facility in the province. The VSCNL team provides surgical, radiology, rehabilitation, and chemotherapy services; visiting specialists are brought in throughout the year to expand the circle of care. In addition to providing industry-leading services and care, VSCNL also works to give back to the community through numerous charitable activities throughout the year including sponsorship of local amateur sports, the SPCA St. John’s, St. John’s Regatta, and local food banks.

“The CVMA Practice of the Year Award, established in 2013 and sponsored by Scotiabank, is just one of the CVMA’s annual awards recognizing outstanding contributions to the Canadian veterinary profession,” expresses Dr. Terri Chotowetz, CVMA President. “The VSCNL is the only hospital in Newfoundland and Labrador providing access to advanced specialist, diagnostic and treatment options 24-hours, 365 days a year, lessening the financial impact of travel for pet owners as well as the stress of travel for both the pet and pet owner.  The glowing letters of support provided in VSCNL’s nomination package, highlighting the care, compassion, and skill Dr. Bailey and her team provides, as well as outlining the centre’s community engagement and educational programs, made it an honour to select VSCNL as the 2019 CVMA Practice of the Year Award recipient.”

“We would like to thank the CVMA for recognizing the efforts of the VSCNL team,” said John Mackenzie, co-owner of VSCNL. “Dr. Bailey and I would also like to thank our incredibly talented and caring team. Our staff work hard to care for each patient that comes in and they never hesitate to give back to our community.”

Visit vscnl.ca or call 709-221-7838 to learn more about the Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland and Labrador. Please visit canadianveterinarians.net for additional information on the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association,.

For media inquiries please contact:
Ronalda Walsh, ABC
P: 709-689-4997
E: rwalsh@nineisland.ca

About the Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland and Labrador (VSCNL)
The Veterinary Specialty Centre is home to a team of highly trained veterinary professionals. Lead by Newfoundland and Labrador’s only board-certified surgeon, Dr. Trina Bailey, the VSCNL team consists of a board-certified radiologist, emergency veterinarians, an occupational therapist, veterinary technicians and assistants, and administrative staff. VSCNL is the only facility in the province providing 24/7 emergency services, diagnostic imaging, surgical, blood donor, and rehabilitation services.

The Veterinary Specialty Centre works collaboratively with veterinary practices across the province and is an extension of the primary care veterinarian’s ability to provide advanced, quality care. Through this collaboration, and the expert level of care offered at VSCNL, pet owners in the province can remain in province to access the specialty care they require for their pets.

About the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association Practice of the Year Award
Each year, through its awards program, the CVMA proudly recognizes individuals who have demonstrated significant accomplishments, exemplary leadership, and tireless commitment to Canada’s veterinary community. Established in 2013, the Practice of the Year Award consists of $1,000 and a plaque and is sponsored by Scotiabank, a leader in banking services for professionals. The award recognizes a veterinary practice team for outstanding achievement within their local community. Such achievements may include innovations in provision of veterinary services, commitment to work-life balance, meaningful community or charitable involvement, or implementation of ‘green’ practice procedures. Nomination packages submitted for all CVMA Awards undergo a rigorous review process by the CVMA Awards Selection Committee after which the recipients are approved by CVMA Council.

Does your pet need to see an ophthalmologist?

Does your pet need to see an ophthalmologist?

The Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland and Labrador will welcome Dr Tara Richards for a visit in July 2019. Dr. Richards is an ophthalmologist who will be visiting our province and will be accepting consultations and limited surgical services the week of July 8th (Monday to Thursday)

How can you see Dr. Richards?
Please ask your family veterinarian to have a referral sent. Once we have the information  you will be contacted with your appointment date and time.

For further information: Please contact our referral coordinator Barbara, by phone at (709) 221-7838 or e-mail at referrals@vscnl.ca.

Learn more about Dr. Richards:
Dr. Tara Richards is a board-certified Ophthalmologist, currently working and living in Ontario. Dr. Richards completed her Bachelor of Science at Waterloo and then earned her DVM degree at OVC in 2004. She completed her Ophthalmology Residency and a PhD at OVC and was board-certified in 2010 by the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

Dr. Tara Richards, Opthamologist

Expert Care, Right Here

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Media Inquiries

Lisa Janes, Hospital Manager

ljanes@vscnl.ca

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

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Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL A1N 3J7

Canada

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VSC and SPCA Working Together to Support Paws on the Pond

It’s not summer until you make your way around Quidi Vidi lake with your pet! So, join us on Saturday, July 13 for the SPCA St. John’s annual Paws on the Pond fundraising event. The Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland and Labrador (VSCNL) is proud to be the presenting sponsor.

The event runs from 9:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and there’s a tonne of family and pet-friendly fun. To participate, individuals or teams should register here. There will be local vendors, entertainment for the kids, and a microchip and nail trim clinic.

Join us for a great time and help raise money for the SPCA St. John’s. We can’t wait to see you and your pets down at the pond!

The dangers of chicken bones.

The dangers of chicken bones.

Bella is an 8-year-old Jack Russell Terrier. One day, she stole a chicken bone from the garbage. When her owner caught her, Bella’s reaction was to hide the evidence by swallowing it whole!

The chicken bone Bella swallowed was very large. How large? It was larger even than her own leg bones. It  was stuck in her esophagus and caused her to start choking. Her owners rushed her in the Veterinary Specialty Centre (VSCNL) Emergency Services for care.

Bella was immediately brought back to our ICU where she received oxygen while the emergency team assessed her. Once Bella was stable enough for the veterinarian to step away, the owners were updated on Bella’s condition and the recommended treatment plan.

Bella was anesthetized and a tube was placed in her trachea to ensure she could breathe while the doctor worked to remove the bone. The bone was too far down to be seen from the mouth. A scope (a special camera) was used to look down into her esophagus. The scope allowed the doctor to guide instruments in place to pull the bone out. The scope also allowed the doctor to visualize the entire esophagus and check for damage.

Bella had no serious damage to her esophagus and with the bone removed she recovered very well. She was able to go home within 24 hours - where hopefully she won't be getting into the garbage again any time soon!

Expert Care, Right Here

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

©2018 Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland & Labrador. All rights reserved.  

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How a microchip and pet insurance helped Digby

How a microchip and pet insurance helped Digby

Nine month old Digby did not have any ID tags on him when he was found, but luckily his owners had him microchipped. Our team was able to identify him because of his microchip. His owners were contacted quickly so they knew where he was and what happened. Digby’s owners also had Trupanion pet insurance allowing them the peace of mind of knowing they would have coverage for the medical care he needed as a result of this serious accident.

When a pet is struck by a car, the injuries can be very extensive and require major surgery to repair.  In some cases, multiple surgeries might be necessary.

When there is serious trauma, the cost for care can be more expensive. This is why we encourage all pet owners to get pet insurance - just in case there is a serious accident.

Digby’s owners had wisely invested in Trupanion pet insurance for Digby, which helped ease the financial stress of this accident. Digby’s injuries were significant, but thankfully not life threatening. Digby suffered a fracture in his left front leg (in his radius and ulna), which was visible on radiographs. He also had signs of head trauma and had CT scan. A CT scan gives our team the best assessment of the bones in the face. Poor Digby had multiple facial fractures.

Digby had surgery to repair his leg and another surgery to stabilize one of his facial fractures. Digby did very well through both surgeries. His recovery took a lot of time and patience as a young pup doesn’t like being on exercise restriction. He is now doing well, and is keeping out of trouble at doggy day care.

Expert Care, Right Here

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

©2018 Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland & Labrador. All rights reserved.  

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Doggie Diarrhea

Doggie Diarrhea

Did you know your pet can experience two different types of diarrhea? Yeah, that’s right. Here’s Dr. Kimberly Carew to explain the differences. 

Expert Care, Right Here

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

©2018 Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland & Labrador. All rights reserved.  

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Winter Safety Tips for Your Pet

Winter Safety Tip for Your Pet

Oh the snow! Some dogs love to play in the white stuff. While it’s easy to get caught up in the excitement, pet owners need to take extra care to keep pets safe and warm from these and other winter hazards. 

Frostbite
Like people, frostbite in dogs is most common on extremities such as ears, tails, and paws. Signs of frostbite include pain, discolouration of the skin, and swelling. If you suspect frostbite, seek veterinary care immediately. Do not massage the area; wrap your pup in warm - not hot - blankets for transport to your nearest emergency clinic. 

Hypothermia 
Hypothermia occurs when body temperature has dropped too low. Signs of hypothermia include shivering, weakness, slow shallow breathing, and being unresponsive. The very young, very old, small dogs, or dogs with very fine or thin hair coats are going to be more at risk to the effects of cold weather. If your dog is shivering outside, you better head inside. Remember to never leave your dog outside unsupervised in very cold temperatures. Similar to frostbite, if you suspect hypothermia, wrap your pup in warm - not hot - blankets and get them to a vet. 

Outdoor Hazards
Winter brings some specific risks such as frozen bodies of water, chemicals used to melt snow and ice, and antifreeze. It’s important to never assume your pet will know to stay off a frozen body of water. Keep dogs on leash in any areas with frozen water unless you are certain the ice will hold their weight. 

Some ice melting salts can be dangerous for pets. These salts can cause serious illness when ingested, but can also be very irritating on the skin. For your own property, look for pet-safe products. If you walk in areas where road salt is being used, take precautions to limit exposure. Use booties for walks or wash your pet’s feet after a walk and don’t allow them to lick ice or slush on their walks. 

Antifreeze is toxic and pets find its taste appealing. If you use antifreeze products, be sure to store them where pets cannot access them. 

Having a dog that loves to be outside in the winter makes the winter season more enjoyable. Keeping them safe will ensure you can have the best winter experience. If your pet has any issues or health concerns related to the winter weather (or any other emergency) the Veterinary Specialty Centre’s Emergency Services are available 24/7 every day. 

Expert Care, Right Here

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

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Did you know younger cats can have noisy breathing?

Did you know younger cats can have noisy breathing?

Steve is a cuddly seven-month-old domestic short hair haired cat. His primary vet at Terra Nova Vet Clinic referred him to the Veterinary Specialty Centre for further examination of his noisy breathing.

Steve was anesthetized to allow our veterinarian to fully examine inside his mouth and throat. It was discovered Steve had a polyp in his airway. A polyp is a benign, fleshy mass that can be found in the nose, throat, or ears of cats. We don’t know exactly what causes them, but they are most commonly found in younger cats. These polyps typically cause irritation for the cat and it is recommended mass be removed.

Steve’s mass was successfully removed. He was sent home shortly after the procedure and prescribed steroids to help reduce the chance of recurrence. For many cats, this is the end of the story.

Steve, unfortunately, had recurrence of his polyp and ultimately underwent more invasive surgery to eradicate his polyps. Steve did well, and was an excellent patient, so still a happy ending!

Expert Care, Right Here

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

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The impact of rawhide chews

The impact of rawhide chews

Chief, an 8-month-old Scottish Terrier, was chewing on a rawhide while his owner was sitting nearby, and he started to cough and retch. Concerned that Chief has a piece of his rawhide chew stuck in his throat, they brought him in the VSCNL Emergency Services.

Dr. Brown-Bury examined Chief and agreed that his symptoms suggested he had something caught in his throat. She sedated Chief to look into his mouth and throat. Dr. Brown-Bury was able to see a bit of rawhide at the very back of his oral cavity. 

It was sitting right at his larynx (where the esophagus and trachea open into the oral cavity). She was able to grasp the rawhide piece and pull it out! Radiographs showed no other material was sitting in the esophagus.

Chief’s sedation was reversed, and he was able to go home with his relieved owners. Stories like Chief’s are why we don’t recommend rawhide chews for dogs. It is not uncommon for a dog to try to swallow a large piece of rawhide and run into trouble! Lucky for Chief his owners were supervising his chew time and were able to act quickly. We’re pretty confident that was the last rawhide chew Chief will ever get!

Expert Care, Right Here

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

©2018 Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland & Labrador. All rights reserved.  

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The importance of diagnostic imaging for your pet

The importance of diagnostic imaging for your pet.

Oscar is a 6 year- old small mixed breed dog who was referred to the Veterinary Specialty Centre Surgical Services from Sunrise Animal Hospital. Oscar was having back pain and unable to use his hind limbs.

Oscar was assessed by the surgical team and had a CT scan to evaluate his spine and spinal cord. The CT scan showed Oscar had Intervertebral Disc Disease. What’s that? The material between the vertebrae of the spine protrudes out of its normal space and pushes on the spinal canal. This results in pain and partial or full paralysis.

Oscar’s compression was quite large, and surgery was required. Without advanced diagnostic imaging, the surgical team would not have known the exact location and extent of the compression.

The next day, Oscar had his surgery. After his surgery, Oscar was happy, comfortable, and eating well. After a few days, he was able to go home.  His owner was advised to restrict activity and undergo physiotherapy for full recovery of function in the legs. We’re so glad Oscar and his owner could head home after his successful surgery and recover at home where there’s always a lot of snuggles.

Expert Care, Right Here

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

Address

860 Topsail Road

Mount Pearl, NL

Canada

A1N 3J7

Contact

(709) 221-7838

info@vscnl.ca

Social

©2018 Veterinary Specialty Centre of Newfoundland & Labrador. All rights reserved.  

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